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Last Updated: 09/28/20

Elizabeth Glaze, Ph.D., DABT

Elizabeth Glaze, Ph.D., DABT

Chief

Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch

Dr. Elizabeth Glaze earned her Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the University of Michigan in 1999. There she evaluated the mechanism by which 5′-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) sensitizes human glioma cells to DNA alkylating agents. As a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, she evaluated the role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) o-quinone-induced reactive oxygen species in the formation of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts, and its relevance in tumor initiation. After her fellowship, Dr. Glaze joined the NIH in 2001 where she managed and provided advice on over a hundred preclinical toxicology/safety studies for cancer treatment, cancer prevention and the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases caused by various biothreat agents. As branch chief of the Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch, she oversees an impressive group of senior scientists that perform the above work, and she heads a laboratory that develops in vitro assays to interrogate mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced toxicities and identifies compounds with the potential to reverse, prevent or mitigate the chemotherapy-induced toxicities.

About the Branch Chief

Elizabeth Glaze, Ph.D., DABT Dr. Elizabeth Glaze earned her Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the University of Michigan in 1999. There she evaluated the mechanism by which 5’-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) sensitizes human glioma cells to DNA alkylating agents. More…